Eurypyle to Penrose - The Venus Tablet of Ammisaduqa

Eurypyle to Penrose - The Venus Tablet of Ammisaduqa

(Originally posted August 18, 2016 on Blogger)

I don't know... I suppose this could fall under an "Ancients" blog category... though I intend to stay light on the details as it has much to do with my research which I'm temporarily being quite protective of for selfish reasons... what other kind of reason is there?

I've been spending much of my day, thus far, building upon a sort of 'family tree' of the Hamazan (aka Amazons) as I continue my efforts to make chronological sense, at least, of that gray area between the myths and ancient historical fact. I've managed to organize dozens of names over the past year, but one name really stood out as exceptionally unique; Eurypyle.

No other Hamazan is mentioned within centuries of when Eurypyle is purportedly to have lived. As catalogued in Karl Wilhelm Ludwig Müller's, Fragmenta Historicorum Graecorum, (of which is being digitized by scholars at the University of Leipzig here), Eurypyle is said to have lived as far back as the 18th century bce. During the time of the wars of Hammurabi... around the time when the Hyksos "invaded" lower Egypt... when Babylon grew from a minor city-state, to becoming the most populace city in the Western world (and perhaps the entire world). More precisely, she is said to have fought against Ninun and Babylon in 1760 bce. This was the year Hammurabi drove out the Elamites and effectively turned Babylon from a minor city-state, into a major power broker in the ancient world. He went on to establish his code of laws in Akkadian on a basalt stele which he displayed for all (literate) citizens to see and read. Laws he claimed were given to him by Marduk, a story mimicked centuries later by another Semitic peoples.

At any rate, I was unable to find further reference to Eurypyle, or even to any mention of an all-female fighting force taking sides against Hammurabi. Given this, along with the immense chronological gap between Eurypyle and the next-oldest Hamazan name (Lysippe), I surmised that Eurypyle did not likely live at the time of Hammurabi. It seemed more likely she would have been a generation or so prior to Lysippe, another Hamazan of stature. Without giving too much away of my research (as it's being used for an epic I'm writing), this led me to place Eurypyle to have lived during the time of one of the last Amorite rulers of the First Dynasty of Babylon; Ammisaduqa. In fact, he was second-to-last of this particular dynasty.

So, skipping through details here, I looked for evidence of a war or battle fought between his army and what could be considered at the very least to be an elite Hamazan fighting unit, and in so doing, I came across text describing the Venus tablet of Ammisaduqa.

Venus tablet of Ammisaduqa written in cuneiform on clay.

Venus tablet of Ammisaduqa written in cuneiform on clay.

It is the 63rd tablet of the Enuma anu enlil upon which is recorded 21-years-worth of the heliacal risings and settings of the planet Venus. Though, these days astronomers/physicists/cosmologists know to extreme specificity the location of planets both future and past. Just as it is known Thuban was the veritable "north star" (pole star) from the 4th to 2nd millennium bce, it is now known when and where Venus rose and set in ancient times. So of course uncertainties have been interpreted from the tablet of Ammisaduqa.

One of my favorite websites is Cornell University Library's, arXiv.org. I utilize its open access to yet-to-be-reviewed academic papers often for keeping up with the latest in the world of cosmology (mostly). In fact, I heavily used it to prepare for the two interviews I conducted on behalf of a friend of mine (SkyDivePhil) in London (see his documentary here).

As it turns out, there is a paper on arXiv written by mathematical physicist, Vahe Gurzadyan titled, "On the Astronomical Records and Babylonian Chronology" in which he addresses why the 56/64 year Venus cycle cannot be traced in the Venus tablet of Ammisaduqa. At the same time he submitted this paper, he submitted another titled, "The Venus Tablet and Refraction", in which he addresses complications of interpretation by near-horizon atmospheric refraction.

But what's really cool (for me anyway), is that Gurzadyan has worked closely with Sir Roger Penrose, who is considered to be one of the premiere cosmologists in the world.

For those who know me, I am equally fascinated by ancient history as I am by modern cosmology, and most particularly with the theoretical physics of what happened before the terribly-named "Big Bang". And of course, potentially the most vital data we have that can look into such extreme physics lies in the WMAP and Planck data sets. I highly recommend going to my friend SkyDivePhil's YouTube channel and watching the ever-growing series of documentaries he has put together of the different ideas physicists have as to what might explain the early Universe (early as in near the "Big Bang", NOT the supposed "beginning" of which I am not even remotely convinced there was one).

His series includes interviews with leading physicists on such hypotheses as Loop Quantum Cosmology, Conformal Cyclic Cosmology, String Theory Cosmology, and his most recent documentary in which I took part, Eternal Inflation & the Multiverse. I invite you to visit his channel here: https://www.youtube.com/user/skydivephil/videos

With that said, I just found it very interesting how my delving into the history of this ancient, enigmatic Hamazan queen, Eurypyle, led me to work done by a modern-day mathematical physicist who has worked specifically on the WMAP data with Sir Roger Penrose. Of course, such deviations are why it has taken me years to finalize research I require of myself to complete my book(s)! And, oddly enough, I uncovered something along this varied path that would work succinctly with my epic. Something I'd have never considered had this wonderful astronomical tangent hadn't been taken.

My notes (all of which are handwritten on good old-fashioned paper, far from the viruses and crashes of the online world) are truly an ugly hodgepodge of haphazardly-scribbled information of which itself spans centuries, subjects, ink color, and even writing style from page-to-page, and unfortunately quite often, within the same page.

Though, should I ever lose my notes, whoever might find them would probably have as much luck interpreting them as linguists have had in interpreting the Phaistos disc (which is most likely a receipt in Linear A). I admit, some days I have to spend a few minutes getting my bearings among the pages of notes I've taken over the years.. but who cares.

Thanks for reading..

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